Screenwriting

Screenwriting is the heavy lifting of all movie projects. The screenwriting articles at Filmmaking Stuff reveal real world tips for how to write a screenplay, how to sell a screenplay how to market your screenplay, how to get a screenwriting agent and how to write movie scripts that sell. Even if you do not live in Hollywood or have any industry connections — by reading the following screenwriting articles, you will get closer to writing awesome screenplays.

Screenwriting With Jim Makichuk

The_Working_Writers_Screenplay

As a screenwriter, your goal is to get your writing made into movies. So you write and write and write. And through perseverance you get an agent and eventually get your story sold and produced. With a little more luck and hard work, you make a living doing what you love. If you want to […]

Jason Faller Makes Movies

jason_faller

I am always impressed by filmmakers who take action and make their movie without asking permission. Jason Faller is one such filmmaker. He produces, markets and sells his own movies. And I believe he embodies the entrepreneurial spirit of the Modern Moviemaker. He stopped by Filmmaking Stuff to provide some tips…

Aspiring screenwriter: Go Hollywood or go indie?

Hollywood-sign

Because I’ve written a few books about screenwriting I sometimes get questions from people just starting out on their careers. One query that has started coming up more often recently is whether it’s better to chase the Hollywood dream or get involved with indie films, including ones made for the web…

How to apply “show, don’t tell” in screenplays

I have a fairly large collection of “pitching sessions from hell” stories, but there was one that stands out because I blew it—afterward. This was early in my career, and actually the pitching session itself went great. The executive loved the idea and commissioned a script for a TV movie. How to apply “show, don’t tell” in screenplays…

How To Use Foreshadowing In Your Screenplay

To avoid having any one element of foreshadowing be too obvious, often the writer will throw in some red herrings–some things that could be foreshadowing but in fact don’t pay off or pay off in a different way than we expect. The person who has the gun in the drawer may become an immediate suspect in our minds, but later maybe we see him use it to light his cigarette and we realize it’s not a real gun (of course he may have a real one somewhere else….). That kind of misdirection keeps the audience guessing.