Writing For The Green Light: Scott Kirkpatrick Interview

Writing For The Green Light

Scott Kirkpatrick is a man with a plan. “I want to help writers build a career by offering a manageable game plan.” In his new book, Writing for the Green Light, Scott offers “real and practical advice to help screenwriters speak to professionals or pitch their work.” As the director of distribution for MarVista Entertainment, a production and distribution company that … [Read more...]

Screenwriting Advice: Write The WORST Scene Ever!

Guinevere_Turner

Guinevere Turner is a writer, director and actor who has been working in film and TV since her 1994 debut film Go Fish. She went on to act in several films, including The Watermelon Woman, Chasing Amy, and Treasure Island. Eventually she teamed up with Mary Harron to write American Psycho and then The Notorious Bettie Page. She stopped by Filmmaking Stuff to share some useful … [Read more...]

Aspiring screenwriter: Go Hollywood or go indie?

Hollywood-sign

Aspiring screenwriter: Go Hollywood or go indie? By, Screenwriter Jurgen Wolff Because I’ve written a few books about screenwriting I sometimes get questions from people just starting out on their careers. One query that has started coming up more often recently is whether it’s better to chase the Hollywood dream or get involved with indie films, including ones made for the … [Read more...]

How NOT To Get Your Screenplay Read

A few years back I finished the first draft of my first screenplay ever. Like a lot of folks who dream of Hollywood success, I was eager to share my work with the world. Problem was, I had no idea what I was doing. Through a friend of a friend, I was put in contact with an "entertainment attorney." I put the words in quotes because while there are tons of people with a … [Read more...]

How To Use Foreshadowing In Your Screenplay

A screenwriter sent me an email saying she understands the need for foreshadowing but wasn't sure how to do it. Of course the specific content depends on the story but here are some general ways you can adapt: 1. A visual clue. A very obvious one is letting us glimpse a gun in a drawer when your protagonist is looking for a pair of scissors. We know that gun will be used at … [Read more...]