How To Promote Your Movie Fan Page On Facebook

As a filmmaker, you need to be promote movie on Facebook.

I am assuming that you already have a personal profile. And if so, you know the platform allows you to stay in touch with friends, have conversations with co-workers and find pictures of your ex-girlfriend. (Not that I ever do those searches.)

But from a promotional perspective, Facebook is a powerful tool for filmmakers. With nearly a billion monthly users, Facebook is one of the most awesome ways to reach your movie target audience.

If you are part of the Filmmaking Stuff community, you probably noticed how nearly 37,000 filmmakers participate and share ideas about filmmaking from all over the world.

How To Promote Your Movie Fan Page On Facebook

If you are wondering how to promote your movie on Facebook, the first thing you need to do is create a page. To get started, open a new tab and log into Facebook. Once you are logged into Facebook, follow this link create a Movie Fan Page.

Step 1 – Set Up Your Movie Fan Page

When you click the link above, you will be redirected to a web page that asks you to pick your page type. If you’re promoting a movie, choose “entertainment” and then pick “movie.” Facebook will then ask you for the name of your movie.

Promote Your Movie On Facebook

From there, Facebook will ask you to log into your account. If you do not have an account, (and you should), you’ll have to create one. Once complete, your Movie Fan Page will be set. All you gotta do is fill in pertinent information about your movie, including a description, photos, links to your movie website and possibly, your movie trailer.

how to promote your movie on facebook

Step 2 – Invite Your Friends to “Like” Your Page

Your next step is to reach out to your Facebook friends and invite them to “Like” your Movie Fan Page. Depending on your genre and storyline, not all of your friends will respond to your request.

Don’t take it personally. Many of my movie projects have been ignored by friends, probably because they are over-inundated with various requests from Angry Birds, Farmville and other distractions.

Assuming you can break through the noise, the advantage to utilizing Facebook to promote your Movie Fan Page is your ability to connect with your audience. Unlike BIG Hollywood power-players, your fans have access to you. This allows you to add value to their experience, beyond simply watching your movie.

By cultivating these relationships, your audience is more likely to promote your movie to their friends, which helps you build your fan-base and make more sales, without spending much money.

Step 3 – Link Your Movie Fan Page to Your Movie Website

When you’re looking to promote your Movie Fan Page, it is important to understand Facebook works best when you supply your followers with relevant info and updates. Where does this info come from? Your movie blog! (Affiliate link.) I’m assuming you have a blog, right?

If you study how successful filmmakers utilize Facebook, you’ll often notice they write content or create videos for their blog. Then they share the info on their Movie Fan Page. The content is usually a behind the scenes production diary. Or in the case of documentaries, it is usually info related the subject matter of the movie.

Step 4 – Promote Your Movie Fan Page

In the event you would like to promote your Movie Fan Page further, Facebook  provides you with some very targeted advertising opportunities to reach your target audience. For example, if you are promoting a zombie movie, you will actually have the ability to reach out to zombie enthusiasts and get them to “Like” your Movie Fan Page.

One of the coolest aspects of building a Movie Fan Page is the ease at which you can build buzz and community around your title.

Step 5 – Update Your Movie Fan Page Frequently!

Marketing is a conversation. Goofy sales pitches and silly “Hey… Look at me…” stuff never works. You need to always think in terms of value. Will your next update add value to your audience? Again, the content needs to be relevant. It should spark a discussion and allow you to meet the people in your audience.

In turn,  your fans will respond favorably. This will be able to monitor word of mouth and find out what people are saying about your movie. And in the event you get a few spammers, you can moderate comments to ensure that the content doesn’t become stupid. (Nobody benefits from stupid content.)

In addition, some filmmakers allow fans to post photos to the fan pages. This sort of activity reinforces community and encourages word of mouth. For example, if your movie is in the festival circuit, you might ask your fans to post pictures of the screening. Then once the photo is posted, friends of these fans may see the picture – which may cause them to “Like” your Movie Fan Page too. But the hidden benefit of user generated content is – you don’t have to worry about generating additional content!

If you’d like to market your movie on Facebook, take a look at my Movie Fan Page system.

How To Grow Your Filmmaking Fanbase

Filmmakers need an audience. Without an audience, you have no business. Many filmmakers ignore this part of the process.

And let’s be honest, building an audience sounds a lot less sexy than actually making the movie. But here is the deal. Traditional film distribution once revolved around shipping physical product. There were fixed costs and accurate sales projections.

We just sold 5000 DVDs to Hollywood Video!

But the days when people converged on video stores searching for obscure independent movies is over.

Viewing habits are changing. People are increasingly interested in the convenience of viewing content on their preferred device. These same people are scattered all over the world.

If this paradigm shift wasn’t challenging enough, production technology now allows any filmmaker with a few hundred dollars to create a backyard indie. And while many of these movies are not worth watching, it doesn’t change the fact that the market is flooded.

This creates an interesting challenge for you. How will someone ever find out about your movie? How will you cultivate word of mouth around your movie? How will you make your movie a profitable enterprise?

Grow Your Filmmaking Fanbase

It is no longer good enough to simply have a great movie! There is only one way to succeed as a modern moviemaker. Focus on building a following of rabid fans who know you and enjoy your work. I’m serious here. Unless you proactively focus on sourcing your own audience, your odds of success are diminished.

Here are some reasons WHY building an audience needs to be your primary objective. Growing your own fanbase allows you to:

  1. Ignore crappy distribution deals.
  2. Accelerate your crowdfunding efforts.
  3. Sell direct to people who know your work.
  4. Stop asking permission to make your movies.
  5. Leverage deals for minimum guarantees.
  6. Provide engagement beyond just the movie.
  7. Encourage word of mouth beyond your community.

In order to succeed as a filmmaker you will need to spend time between each movie working to expand your audience engagement.

At the very least, growing your fanbase means you will need to create a production company blog, a YouTube Channel, Facebook page, a Twittler handle and a mailing list. Once you create these tools, you will need to create new content frequently. What kind of content? You will want to focus on content that appeals to your desired target audience.

For example, if you are a horror filmmaker, you might profile other movies in the genre, provide your audience with one minute teaser videos, and Tweet about horror. If you produce environmental documentaries, you would want to focus on environmental issues. And once you figure out your focus, you will want to update, and update frequently.

You will also want to link ALL profiles to Klout. (I’ll save Klout for another article. But in short, the site measures your social influence and rewards you with perks.)

Here are some mandates to get you started:

  • Movie Site Blog: Update at least 3 times per week. Initial goal: 100 articles.
  • YouTube Channel: Update at least 2 times per week. Initial goal: 100 videos.
  • Facebook Page: Provide links to you blog and YouTube updates. Initial goal: 2500 likes.
  • Twitter: Tweet your blog and YouTube updates. Initial goal: 2500 followers.
  • Mailing List: Email your blog and YouTube updates. Initial goal: 5000 subscribers.

In addition to creating this content, you will want to use these tools to create personal relationships with your fan-base. Answer emails as they come in. Respond to comments. And above all else, always work to provide something of value to your followers.

If you need additional tips like this, check out these professional filmmakng tools.

 

Untapped Crowdfunding Site For Filmmakers

As a filmmaker, one of the challenges you face is how to finance a film. When I was starting out, things were much different. Back then, if you wanted to finance a movie, you had to cross your fingers and wait for someone to grant you permission…

The problem is, many people in Hollywood are still waiting for someone else to give them permission. Permission to make a movie. Permission to be successful. Permission to live the best life possible. UGH!

Here is a little secret. If you’re looking to raise money for your movie, set up a crowdfunding campaign. This allows you to test your concept from day one. And if successful, crowdfunding also allows you to find the people who may be most interested in your movie. In addition to providing you with funding, some of these folks will help you spread word of mouth.

Two popular crowdfunding platforms are IndieGoGo and KickStarter.

 

The Secret Society Of Modern Indie Filmmakers

Earlier this week, Sheri Candler was spreading word of mouth about a test screening of Gary King’s indie film musical:  How Do You Write A Joe Schermann Song. So I did something I haven’t done for awhile – I got out from behind my computer screen to meet and mingle with some new filmmakers face-to-face.

As the lights dimmed and Gary’s movie flickered across the screen, I was reminded of the year I lived in New York City. This was a time when I couch surfed between a sofa and an inflatable air mattress, all the while dreaming that I would someday make movies. Admittedly, maybe these memories were flooding back as a result of Gary’s movie. I mean, the story is based in Manhattan.

During the screening, and afterwards, I realized I have been missing something I haven’t felt for years.

I have forgotten the joy that comes from participating in activities with other folks from the indie filmmaking community. And I also realized that my world of indie filmmaking (once defined and limited by the following filmmaking mantra): save up all summer and buy an Arri BL, scrape together enough money to pay for film and processing, make the movie and PRAY for a distribution deal that makes sense – I’m pleased to say that era of filmmaking is over.

As a result of lower priced production equipment, coupled with new, non-discriminatory distribution, YOU can make, market and sell your movie this year and you don’t need to ask permission. Filmmakers like Gary King epitomize this movement – asking questions like How do you write a Joe Schermann Song starring awesome actress Christina Rose (nice work Christina!)

Past that, there is something else. While the studios are excited about UltraViolet and a new attempt to control their piece of the world wide web, our thriving indie community could care less. Instead of worrying about traditional distribution, modern movie makers are more concerned with their YouTube following – and the size of their growing audience.

As a filmmaker, you are part of movie making history. And you probably don’t know it. But like all artistic and social movements that have come before, you are riding this wave. The question is, will you take advantage of this opportunity – or will you find yet another reason why you can’t make your movie this year?

ALSO:

At the screening, I met close to a dozen people who claimed to have heard of me or knew me from this website. Please give me some time to adjust socially – It’s not every day that people approach me and quote my ideas back to me… But I want you to know I am honored and grateful for your readership.

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