How I Use The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera

My name is Bojan Dulabic and I’m a filmmaker from Vancouver. I’m currently in the process of finishing my second feature film Project: Eugenics, which I shot mostly on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera.

In this article I’d like to talk about some of pros and cons, myths associate with this camera, how I used it to shoot a feature film and the post production workflow.

 Myths About The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera

One of the biggest myths is that, even though the camera is called “pocket”, that it really is not, because once you start adding a rig, larger lenses and other accessories it becomes a very large camera. It is true that situations will dictate setups. But what most filmmakers don’t talk about is the fact that this camera can be used by itself with just the body and a lens.

I have used it many times on my shoot with just a bare bones setup. I wouldn’t shoot an entire film like this. But when you need to do a quick insert shot or a simple establishing shot with just the camera on a tripod, this little wonder shines.

In my current zombie flick, I needed some establishing shots of empty streets to create a bit of a creepy atmosphere. So one Sunday morning I got up early, took my camera and my Panasonic 14mm lens and a simple tripod and drove around looking for the right location.

After an hour of filming, I gathered enough establishing shots for the intro of the film. I didn’t need a second unit crew, any permits or anyone else for that matter. Don’t be afraid to use the camera just by itself, you’d be surprised at the quality it can produce.

Blackmagic Pocket

Pros Of The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera

One of the things that blew me away about the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera is the fact that it shoots in ProRes HQ! ProRes HQ is a format you usually edit in. So for example, if you are shooting on a typical DSLR, which shoots in h.264, you would upconvert the footage to ProRes and then start editing. But any time you upconvert footage, you lose quality.

With the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, no conversion is needed. This gives you a great quality image. The amount of additional data you get with ProRes compared to h.264 gives you a lot more room to play with in terms of color grading. For example, one minute in h.264 will be about 200-400 mb, depending on the compression. That same minute in ProRes HQ will be about 1-2 GB.

That’s more than tripling the amount of data that you have to play with!

Camera RAW

If you want more flexibility and quality you can also shoot in Camera RAW. Camera RAW is an amazing format. It produces incredible footage and you have the ultimate control over color grading and adjusting for over or under exposed footage. Of course, as with any technology, everything has its limits and you should always try to get it right in camera but mistakes happen.

The fact that the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera has the capability of shooting in ProRes HQ (and all the other flavors of ProRes) and is also capable of shooting in RAW, is simply amazing!

Price & Updates

The fact that the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera only costs $1000 US (just the body) is an incredible deal. Another, perhaps more important fact is that Blackmagic is continuously providing updates for its users. In the eight months since I’ve had the camera, there have been four major updates. Initially, there was no histogram, audio meters and you couldn’t format the SD card in camera, all those things and more have been updated. I don’t know of any other camera manufacturer who provides this kind of a service for free.

Lenses

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera is a micro four thirds camera. This could be a problem if you don’t own any micro four thirds lenses, however, the good thing is that there are adapters that will fit virtually any lens out there. So, if you own a bunch of full frame lenses by Canon or Nikon, you will still be able to use those by purchasing an adapter.

Depending on the adapter you might be spending $500 or more. However, if you have lenses worth thousands of dollars, getting one lens adapter to fit all or most of them, is not bad at all. In my case I decided to get two micro four thirds lenses; the Panasonic 25mm f/1.4 and the Panasonic 14mm f/2.5, which I’m very pleased with.

Cons Of The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera

The is the single biggest con on this camera is the lack of extensive battery life.

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera comes with a small 800mAh battery, which is the Nikon en-el20. This battery will give you 30 to 40 minutes at the most. And from my experience, it could be even less. From this perspective, the stock battery is completely useless.

One option to combat the problem is getting new batteries. I ordered four 1800mAh batteries and I am hoping each will last for an hour. These batteries are very inexpensive.

Another option is to have an external battery, which I have as well. I bought a no name CCTV battery on eBay months ago, which lasts me for about 5 hours, when fully charged. I used this battery for most of my shoot. Only problem is that using the camera bare bones with an external battery can be challenging. My solution was to use a cellphone holder and mount it on top of the camera.

blackmagic pocket set up

For situations where I needed to use my rig I was able to fit it underneath the body. I used industrial strength velcro to secure the battery and that worked just fine.

blackmagic pocket camera

This is something you’ll have to think about and the solution will vary depending on your setup.

SD Cards

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera uses SD cards to record footage. Unlike other cameras by Blackmagic, due to the size of the camera body there is no room to slide in an SSD. On one hand, this is good because SD cards are much smaller and easier to carry. However, they are also much more expensive than SSDs.

Because you are shooting in ProPres and RAW you cannot use regular class 10 SD cards that you use in your DSLR. You have to buy cards with at least 80mbps speeds. Because of the speed limitations you will find that only a few card manufacturers work on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera. This the fault of the card companies because a lot of times they mislabel their cards and what looks like an 80mbps card could be in fact 40mbps.

From personal experiences you can’t go wrong with SanDisk. As long as you get the right speed you will be fine. There are a few things to keep in mind when deciding on which speed to get. For example, if you are shooting in ProRes and RAW in 24fps, you can use the SanDisk Extreme Plus 80mbps. However, if you are shooting in ProRes and RAW higher than 24fps you can only shoot in ProRes, if you use the SanDisk Extreme Plus 80mbps.

If you want to be able to shoot in RAW with, let’s say 30fps, you will need the SanDisk Extreme Pro 95mbps. This is important to know because the price difference between those two can add up.

I have seen a 64GB SanDisk Extreme Plus 80mbps for as low as $50 US. Where as the Extreme Pro 90mbps will be close to $100 US. When you compare that to an SSD drive, let’s say a 128 mb, which you can get for $50-$70 easily, things start to look different.

Also, the massive files that ProRes HQ and Camera RAW create will not give you much room to play with.

If I use any of my 64GB cards, I get about 44 minutes shooting 24fps in ProRes HQ. And I get about 33 minutes if I shoot in 30fps. If I shoot in RAW using 24fps, I usually get about 12 minutes and 9 minutes if I shoot using 30fps. Depending on your production you will need either one or two or more 128 GB SD cards, which can cost you an arm and leg, or several 64GB cards.

Crop Factor

Another thing to keep in mind is the crop factor. APS-C based DSLRs have a crop factor of 1.6. That’s essentially how much you are zoomed in. So, if you have a 50mm lens on a Canon T3i, you actually have an 80mm lens.

If you have a full frame camera you obviously don’t have to worry about crop factors. The downside with micro four thirds cameras, like the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, is that the crop factor is 2.88. So if you have a 50mm lens you actually have a 144mm lens. That’s a huge difference.

As mentioned before, if you have a bunch of full frame lenses, you can get an adapter to be able to use those on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, and in that case you won’t have to worry about the crop factor.

Another reason to keep the crop factor in mind is the fact that the more you are zoomed in the shakier the footage will be. For example, my Panasonic 25mm f/1.4 lens gets very shaky when handheld because it is essentially a 72mm lens. My 14mm lens is much better when it comes to that because it is actually a 40mm lens. I decided to get the 25mm one because it works really well in low light. When I use it with my rig, the shakiness is not a problem at all and it still works for quick insert shots when its handheld.

Deleting Clips

Another con about the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera is the fact that you cannot delete individual clips in camera. This can be a pain because sometimes you might have takes where you know you will not use the shot. Normally you might have deleted the footage to make more room.

Unfortunately, this is something that you cannot do with the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera. And as I mentioned before, Blackmagic has solved lots of issues with various updates and they know that users want to be able to delete clips in camera, so it’s just a matter of time.

Menu

The menu is not user friendly. Features that you need, so you can to change on the fly are often buried. For example, if you want to change the exposure, you will need to perform 5-10 menu clicks, depending on where you are. This might not sound a lot. But if you are shooting a live event where one second can make the difference between you getting that perfect shoot or not, this is a problem.

Again, all these things can be changed with a software update. Blackmagic has already added menu functionality with an earlier update so this could be solved very easily.

Post With The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera

Color Grading

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera is made for color grading. While the camera gives you the option to shoot in video mode, which doesn’t require color grading (similar to DSLRs) the camera is really is meant to be used with a color grading program. This takes time to get used to. If you use the camera in film mode, you will get a flat image. It is then up to you to grade it which ever way you like.

I am playing around with Adobe Speedgrade. Adobe Premiere will do a decent job with basic color grading. Additionally, you can always download DaVinci Resolve for free. This is Blackmagic’s software.

Computer

When working with ProRes and especially RAW files you will need lots of processing power. I upgraded my 5 year old Mac Pro with a new 3 GB graphics card and 32 GB of ram and working with ProRes HQ files is not a problem but working with RAW can be challenging.

Even though I only use RAW for short insert clips, rendering can still take a while. There is also (sadly) no standardized workflow for RAW files when it comes to video. Premiere Pro will recognize the multiple image files as one video file and you can import it and start cutting as easy as any video file but if you want to make use of the RAW settings and adjust exposure or white balance, there is no direct way to do that with complete control.

One way is to open the files in After Effects, which will give you the RAW interface that you get for images. In the end it works, but it requires effort. This alone keeps me from shooting a full feature in RAW. On the other hand, the footage would look amazing!

In conclusion, the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera is an amazing tool for any indie filmmaker. Like any piece of technology it has its flaws, but as long as you are aware of them and find a way to work around them, you will be able to take your production to the next level.

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If you would like to check out the trailer for my feature film and see what the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera is cable of, visit: http://www.projecteugenics.com. And for more tips and tricks on low to no-budget filmmaking check out my blog at http://www.filmmakingtoday.com

Should You Go To Film School?

If you’re just starting out as a filmmaker, deciding if you should attend a traditional film school is something you need to decide. And it’s a costly decision – some of my friends here in Los Angeles are over fifty-thousand dollars in debt.

While most of my friends value having a college education, all agree that having a  film school degree will not guarantee success in Hollywood. Like any industry, becoming successful requires passion, commitment and hard work.

Last year, I was introduced to filmmaker Seth Hymes. When he was in high school, he worked as Production Assistant, Sound Tech and an Editor. After high school, he went off to film school. In fact, he graduated from NYU with honors. From there, he was an editor for Fox News Channel and also managed to get two features into production.

So I sat down with Seth and asked him some questions about his experience.

Jason Brubaker
Seth. After visiting your website and chatting, you seem to have an interesting perspective on formal film school education. What are your thoughts? Is there any value in film school?

Seth Hymes
No, there isn’t. And it’s a great question. What does “value” mean? It means that something adds merit or worth to your life for a reasonable cost. A lot of people say things like “you learn the basics” and it’s a “good place to experiment”.

Jason Brubaker
So in your experience, you think film school is over priced?

Seth Hymes
Well, in film school, you write a check for $100,000. In return, they give you a $2,000 video camera and tell you how to push the on button. Are you going to learn something? Sure. Is it valuable? No. There is no value in learning basic technical concepts for an obscene mark up in cost.

Jason Brubaker
In the past, students enrolled in film school because held the promise of networking, as well as access to equipment. You’re saying this sort of stuff is no longer relevant?

Seth Hymes
The 3 main “values” of film school are no longer relevant. They are, access to equipment, lessons in filmmaking craft and connections. In the 60s, 70s, and 80s, when people like Lucas, Scorsese, and Spike Lee went to film school, it was probably a good investment. You couldn’t just pick up a high quality HD camera and start shooting. Filmmaking equipment cost a ton of money and was hard to find. You really couldn’t learn about things like continuity and storyboarding without either apprenticing with a filmmaker or going to school. And it was a good place to meet other creative professionals.

Jason Brubaker
But all of that has changed.

Seth Hymes
Yeah. If you look at today, High Definition filmmaking equipment costs less than a semester at most film schools. The craft of filmmaking, from lighting, editing, shot composition, writing – all of it is available to learn on websites like yours, as well as other sites all over the net. And these days, most connections happen through the net. And further, many new filmmakers find their agents because they produce a short and get some heat on youtube, rather than meeting them in school.

Jason Brubaker
Sort of a silly question. But would you recommend that anybody attends film school?

Seth Hymes
I do not recommend anybody attend film school. It is an unholy waste of money and time. And not only are the schools making a huge profit, they also neglect to teach their grads about anything of real value or importance when it comes to having a career in the business. Things like real networking, fundraising, or film distribution.

Jason Brubaker
So instead of film school, what suggestions do you have for any students who is considering a degree in filmmaking?

Seth Hymes
If you’re considering film school, here’s the litmus test. If it’s a community college or vocational school where classes are anywhere from $60 to $1000, go for it. If anyone is charging more than that, they are making an obscene profit and should be dismissed outright. You will be mocked within the film business for attending such an institution. Instead, I recommend that students save their money, buy their own equipment, and learn how to shoot their own movie.

These days, filmmakers can learn everything you need to know in a week or less.

Jason Brubaker
Reading your posts on other websites and the comments that follow, I can see why some filmmakers, especially the filmmakers sitting on film school debt can get a little emotional with your perspective.

Seth Hymes
Most film school grads and filmmakers agree with me, but there are a few haters. Some people hate hearing the truth. It’s hard for some people to admit they got hosed out of $100K, but the consensus everywhere is that film school is a waste.

Jason Brubaker
I took a look at your website. Tell us what you teach there.

Seth Hymes
I teach people first, exactly why places like NYU are a complete joke and secondly, what to do instead of film school. There’s a lot of pressure to go to college, and I understand that. My book “Film Fooled” is a powerful reality check, a class by class account of NYU’s film curriculum to help people realize that no, they are not missing out on anything by skipping film school.

Jason Brubaker
Sounds like you think film schools should improve their curriculum.

Seth Hymes
Yeah. I get into the stuff they should be teaching in schools. Mainly, how to be taken seriously as a director from day one, how to get on real film sets, meet real working filmmakers, write feature scripts, manage a set, hire film students, and get seen. Anyone taking my course will be 4 years ahead of any film school student in just a week.

Jason Brubaker
Ok. So tell us about your online film course.

Seth Hymes
Ok. To find out more about my courseware at Film School Secrets, prospective filmmakers can Click Here!

Jason Brubaker
Thanks for stopping by Seth.

Seth Hymes
Thanks for having me.

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As a general disclaimer, all the links in this article are affiliate links. Please conduct your own due diligence before making any purchase, both here and anywhere on earth.

Filmmaker David Allen Talks Modern Moviemaking and VOD Distribution

As we get closer to an independent filmmaking business driven by video on demand distribution, I am on the hunt for various case studies that can help filmmakers navigate the changing world.

I caught wind of an indie production company based in Australia called Rapidfire Productions. This is a production company that operates as a self sustaining modern moviemaking business. They develop, produce and distribute their genre specific titles through their own distribution arm. David W. Allen is one of the producers. Earlier this week he stopped by Filmmaking Stuff to share some ideas on how to make, market and sell movies through new forms of internet distribution.

Jason Brubaker
What is your name?

David W. Allen
David W. Allen

Jason Brubaker
How did you get started making movies?

David W. Allen
I have always been into making movies with my long time best friend and director of our most recent feature, “The Gates of Hell,” Kelly Dolen. As kids in our early teens we would always be running around with a video camera making home movies and writing our own horror and action screenplays.

Jason Brubaker
And then when you felt ready, you made the shift to features?

David W. Allen
Yes. Our first feature length film was a low low budget vampire flick called ‘Reign in Darkness’ which we both wrote and directed. We only had $49k to make this with and considering the budget it came out okay.

Jason Brubaker
Sounds like an exciting first feature.

David W. Allen
We jumped on a plane to LA wide eyed and innocent to sell our film and make it big in Hollywood.

Jason Brubaker
I felt the same way after our first feature. It’s like you work so hard to make the impossible, possible. Hollywood sure seems like the logical next step.

David W. Allen
Ahhhh how naive we were all those years ago. [Laughter]

Jason Brubaker
So what happened? Were you able to sell the movie for an amazing cash advance and get a 3 picture deal?

David W. Allen
We ended up getting a distribution deal with a sales agent who we were introduced to by an entertainment lawyer.

Jason Brubaker
Was it a good deal?

David W. Allen
No. We got ripped off and didn’t see a great deal of money for the film. That was 10 years ago. Today the title is still selling out there, online. The movie is making money for other people but not us.

Jason Brubaker
How did that change your perspective about traditional distribution?

David W. Allen
I learned a very valuable lesson with ‘Reign’ and vowed if we ever made another feature film we would distribute ourselves.

Jason Brubaker
I agree with you. Especially when it comes to video on demand distribution.

David W. Allen
I could see where the Internet was heading and knew it was going to be the way to reach our future audiences with our Independent films.

Jason Brubaker
What is Rapidfire Productions?

David W. Allen
Rapidifire Productions was established by Kelly Dolen and myself in 1999 with the sole purposed to produce a diverse, wide range of Independent high concept genre films, ranging from action, drama, horror and sci-fi.

Jason Brubaker
So you are staying very genre specific?

David W. Allen
Our long-term goal was to make commercially successful projects that satisfy a marketplace craving for intelligent genre films and build a distribution arm for low budget Indy films.

Jason Brubaker
And it sounds like your title called “The Gates Of Hell” fits your model. Tell us about the project.

David W. Allen
The Gates of Hell is a dark psychological thriller and horror flick which is inspired by a combination of “old school” films like The Exorcist and The Thing and the adrenalin of cutting edge video games like Gears of War and Manhunt.

Jason Brubaker
Could you tell our readers where to find out more about your movie?

David W. Allen
Here is the website: www.TheGatesOfHellMovie.com

Jason Brubaker
How did you come up with the idea?

David W. Allen
It was back when Kelly and I were sharing a place together and we were talking about what we can make next for a low cost and high commercial value. We were talking about a filmmaking seminar we attended in Melbourne, Australia conducted by Dov Simmens, a Hollywood indy filmmaking guru.

Jason Brubaker
I am familiar with Dov and his work. What was the most inspiring advice he gave you?

David W. Allen
He said the best thing to do with your first film is to get a bunch of young people and take them to a single location and chop them up.

Jason Brubaker
Ha! I think that is sound filmmaking business advice.

David W. Allen
That was the thought process that ignited the idea for The Gates of Hell.

Jason Brubaker
So once you had your idea, what came next?

David W. Allen
Kelly and I started brainstorming ideas and we come up with an old condemned orphanage that used to house discarded deformed children that upper class people didn’t want.

Jason Brubaker
That sounds like a true horror movie.

David W. Allen
We researched this online to see if in fact a place like this did exist and they did back in the early 1940’s. And then we added some Hollywood to the idea and the first treatment was written.

Jason Brubaker
So once you had the treatment, what came next in your process?

David W. Allen
From there Kelly ran with the idea and developed it into a screenplay which was constantly developed over some years to get it to a stage where it was ready to make. We had a local artist drawing characters for the film and story boards you name it was all happening.

Jason Brubaker
What was your role during this time?

David W. Allen
I focused on the producing and marketing. I was responsible for developing an internet marketing strategy, building the website and creating the entire online distribution business model. I planned an online release from the very beginning.

Jason Brubaker
Building your movie business plan based on an internet marketing strategy is a very new concept. Was there any pushback from other producers or investors?

David W. Allen
The Investors had no intention of going down this path. They wanted the big blue sky and Hollywood. But I knew in the end they would end up going with my plan to self-distribute.

Jason Brubaker
What was Kelly’s role?

David W. Allen
Kelly went out and raised the large majority of the money from investors of our previous film and the new investors came from people he knew from his years selling home audio equipment at the large retailer JB HI-FI. The main investors were customers of Kelly’s from this store and over the years they come to value him as a friend more than just a shop assistant.

Jason Brubaker
So would you say that filmmakers must first understand the value of relationships?

David W. Allen
There is such a valuable lesson to be learned here especially with the social networking explosion on the Internet… Success is all about the relationships both online and offline.

Jason Brubaker
That makes me remember a quote I learned while selling overpriced hot tubs in college. “People buy from people they trust and like.”

David W. Allen
In my opinion this is the key to being successful in offline and online business and film distribution. Over time your followers will come to trust you and believe you, so when you have something to sell they will be far more likely to buy because they feel like they know and trust you.

Jason Brubaker
So let’s talk more about your movie sales strategy. How did you handle the sales, marketing and distribution?

David W. Allen
After the film was completed we took the film to a number of film festivals such as Screamfest, Amberg, Sacramento, and NYC. We also attended some film markets such as AFM and Cannes.

Jason Brubaker
Were you able to gain any traction?

David W. Allen
The film had great reviews but with all the positive hype around the the film the distribution deals were not very favorable and we didn’t want to go down the same path as we did with our first film ‘Reign in Darkness’ where were got a raw distribution deal.

Jason Brubaker
That is a tough choice. Many first time feature filmmakers will consider deals that do not pay a dime, just for the validation that comes from someone else saying “Great work! You’re a REAL filmmaker!”

David W. Allen
Yeah. But being passionate about everything Internet, I was pushing the proposal of just self-distributing online. But it was a hard sell to our investors who wanted to see the film in cinemas and up in lights.

Jason Brubaker
That is interesting. I guess some of those folks need traditional validation too?

David W. Allen
Well, all I wanted was to see a positive net return for sales of the film and focus on introducing the film to its market online and letting its popularity spread over time.

Jason Brubaker
Sounds like a pragmatic approach to your modern movie business. Were you able to get your way?

David W. Allen
I managed to get my way in the end with a little compromise. The investors wanted to see the movie in the cinemas so we did a distribution deal with an Australian distributor for Australian and New Zealand rights.

Jason Brubaker
Sounds like a hybrid deal. You retain some rights, while licensing other rights through other channels. Was this a profitable strategy for your movie?

David W. Allen
As I am writing this, the distributor is still yet to do anything with ‘The Gates of Hell’, which is no surprise to me, but a big lesson for the investors who wanted a quick return and blue sky.

Jason Brubaker
At least you can move forward with your own internet movie marketing strategy. Can you tell us a little more about your marketing plan?

David W. Allen
My marketing plan is simple. With very little money, I am taking the advice of a brilliant marketer Seth Godin and build a tribe and sell the movie to that tribe who over time will spread the word.

Jason Brubaker
What are the mechanics involved in building a tribe?

David W. Allen
I will be collecting emails from prospective customers so we can sell them backend products that they actually want.

Jason Brubaker
What about marketplaces? Where will you actually sell your movie?

David W. Allen
My distribution plan is to start off with selling the DVD then when I get some traction in the market I will approach a VOD distributor and then an iTunes aggregator and Amazon. I will also look at Netflix but I will wait until it gets more popularity so to get a better upfront fee.

Jason Brubaker
You mentioned DVD. Who is going to handle your DVD fulfillment?

David W. Allen
For the DVD distribution I use a company called Disk.com. They were highly recommended to me by some of my Internet marketing peers who use them to create and distribute their information products. They are based in the USA and is a great place for the shipping of the DVDs within the US and throughout Europe and the UK. There are some great companies here in Australia but the shipping costs would be way too high given our main market is in the USA and UK.

Jason Brubaker
Outside of distribution and your website, how are you spreading word of mouth?

David W. Allen
Facebook Pages and Twitter play a bit part in my strategy. I use these platforms to build what is called Market Leadership. I also hit the forums and get involved in the top ones and this is a great way to get people to check out the film.

Jason Brubaker
What about getting prominent website owners to review the movie?

David W. Allen
I am sending out copies to influences in the market place, people who already have a large following in the horror market and if they like the film they will tell their tribe about it.

Jason Brubaker
When I first saw your movie website, I was impressed. I think it has all the components necessary to create a movie sales funnel. But you also have something called an opt-in box to build your mailing list. How important is a mailing list for modern moviemakers?

David W. Allen
Very important! It is such a valuable asset for filmmaker if they don’t abuse it. It takes so long to build traffic to your website so you want to be capturing as many leads as possible so you can stay in touch with them, send them cool free stuff and then sell them backend products related to their film.

Jason Brubaker
Yes. I think filmmakers need to take charge of sourcing their own core audience. But what about in-between projects? How do you leverage your list?

David W. Allen
Between projects, the other thing filmmakers can do is introduce other people’s related products to their list for a fee or on an affiliate basis. Over time your mailing list will become very valuable. The bigger and more responsive the list, the more other industry players will want to pay filmmakers money to get related products or films in front of their subscribers.

Jason Brubaker
What suggestions do you have for other filmmakers who want to create their own movie business?

David W. Allen
Look at the market you’re making the film for first. This is a business and if you are going to spend money on making a film you better be sure there is a big enough and hungry enough market out there to buy your film and other backend products.

Jason Brubaker
You keep mentioning marketing related products. Could you explain this a little more?

David W. Allen
I look at the film itself as a lead generation product for the purpose of building a big list. I am not all that concerned about making the money back on the DVD itself but on other monetizing avenues over time including advertising.

Jason Brubaker
That is an interesting concept. Most filmmakers do not think like marketers. Yet if we want to make money making movies, it makes sense that we would need to diversify our product offerings.

David W. Allen
The modern filmmaker needs to think beyond the film itself as the only means of generating income. The money online is where the eyeballs are. Think about it.

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Find out more about how to sell your movie.