How To Meet Rich People So You Can Get Movie Money

So you want to know how to meet rich people (so you can get movie money.)

The process of raising money is simple. All you have to do is build a trusting business relationship with a few rich people, present the necessary legal paperwork and ask for the money. Once you get the check, you can make your movie.

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Of course, we both know that raising movie money is easy in theory. But it can be a real challenge for filmmakers.

For many filmmakers, the biggest missing skill is knowing how to meet rich people.

Maybe you don’t know where to start. I get that.

I grew up in a rural community. I didn’t know any rich people. I didn’t know where to start or where to find them. To learn how to meet rich people, I moved to New York City and started work as a producer’s assistant. This helped me figure things out.

What I found was, most rich people are experienced business professionals. They are successful in businesses outside of indie filmmaking. They are experienced investors. And as such, they are seeking interesting investment opportunities.

And more than that, rich people are all around you – And unless you know what to look for, you might just miss them…

What You Need To Know About Investors

Most prospective investors are looking for you to describe the similarities between your indie filmmaking project and their businesses. So if you want to find out how to meet rich people, before you make your pitch –  You first need to understand how to describe your filmmaking in the context of general business.

I put together the following graphics to help you.

1. Filmmakers and Entrepreneurs (Prospective Investors) Start With a Blueprint

Your screenplay is the blueprint to your movie. Entrepreneurs are similar. Like you, these business professionals go into each venture with a blueprint for their product. From there, they create a full business plan for how their product will be manufactured, marketed and distributed. This process if similar to making a movie.

How To Meet Rich People

2. Entrepreneurs and Filmmakers Seek OPM

One secret of the rich is OPM (Other People’s Money). Even though many rich people could fund their own business ideas, this represents too much of a risk. So most rich people go into their network and raise money for their projects. This is the same for indie filmmakers. It is too risky to invest all of your money in a movie project. Always leverage OPM.

find rich people so you can fund your movie

3. Entrepreneurs and Filmmakers Utilize Money To Create a Company

When creating a product, most business professionals establish a physical location for their business. From there, these entrepreneurs utilize the investment money to manufacture their product. When it comes to your indie film, your business will require that you utilize many locations to film your movie. And your product is your movie.

fund your movie

4. Entrepreneurs and Filmmakers Manufacture a Product

After months and months of planning and production, the results for both the business professional and filmmaker are similar. Assuming you worked with an awesome team, you will make your movie. As a filmmaker, your product IS your movie.

get movie money

5. Entrepreneurs and Filmmakers Distribute Their Product

After production you will have a product ready for the marketplace. Both the filmmaker and the entrepreneur will market, distribute and sell their product to (hopefully) a rabid marketplace of fans who can’t wait to partake in the experience.

distribute your movie

Here’s the deal. Rich and successful people are not any different than you and me. Except they have some very specific business experience and a pretty robust bank account.

What You Need To Know About Rich People

For the most part, rich people are not mean, dirty or greedy. In fact, many wealthy people are generous. They are excellent networkers. And when you meet them, (assuming they like you) most successful people will always think in terms of: “How can I help this person get closer to their goals?”

This is important. Because if you want to find out how to meet rich people, you need to understand that the way you think about wealth can either help you or hinder your efforts.

A quick story about a filmmaker I know:

So picture this. The other day I was in a popular Los Angeles diner eating breakfast with my buddy. Like a lot of filmmakers, he is trying to raise money for a movie. He just can’t get any traction.

At one point we get to the topic of  how to meet rich people. And my buddy mentions this one guy he knows. And here is what he said:

“That guy is FILTHY rich.”

Can you see the problem with this statement?

My filmmaker friend is trying to figure out how to meet rich people, but he’s having difficulty getting traction.

The reason?

At some core level, he thinks rich people are filthy. He thinks that anybody with money is unclean… Dirty…

Can you imagine going into any social situation where you think the people you’re about to meet are unsanitary?

It gets worse. Here are some of the beliefs you probably have about money and rich people:

  1. Money is the root of all evil.
  2. I’d rather be happy than rich.
  3. I am no good with money.
  4. It takes money to make money.
  5. Money is dirty.

If you are looking to find out how to meet rich people (and attract these people into your life) you need to get honest about your limited beliefs about money, and find ways to shed them.

If you hold the general belief that rich people are in some way greedy and unwilling to help anyone, think again. Aside from a few rotten apples, the statistics show that wealthy people are also some of the most generous.

Why is having a positive attitude towards the affluent important for a filmmaker?

Because until your movies are financed and distributed by a studio, you’ll need to learn how to raise money for your projects. You’ll need to know what potential investors look for in a project. And when it comes time to shake the money tree, it would be helpful to have a few rich people just a phone call away.

How To Meet Rich People (So you can get movie money.)

Finding out how to meet rich people is easier than you think. But before we go there, it is important to note that whenever you go out to raise money, you will most likely meet a bunch of posers, frauds and idiots.

To help you distinguish the BS, I reached out to Tom Malloy for advice. If you haven’t heard of Tom Malloy, you should know he’s a indie film finance expert. So far in his career, he has raised over 25 million dollars to produce his movies.

Here are Tom Malloy’s five tips for finding out if your rich person is “real.”

In trying to land an HNI (High Net Worth Individual) for your film, one of the main obstacles film makers face is qualifying if an investor is “Real.”  Real means that he or she CAN actually fund your film.

Real investors are not guys who know other guys. 

Real investors are the guys that can actually put in the money.  I present to you 5 tips for you to know in your quest to find who’s real and who’s not!

1.   Google him.  It sounds simple, and it is.  Do your research on the guy.  It’s easy to find out information if you just take the time and search for it.

2.   Take into account what he’s wearing and what he’s driving.  Sometimes relying solely on image is a mistake.  The guy with the 3 piece suit is the phony and the guy in shorts and a t-shirt is the eccentric millionaire.  But where does he live?  What does he drive?  Many HNIs enjoy the comforts their money brings.  This method is not foolproof, but it does work 90% of the time.  I had a meeting with a potential investor and he was missing some teeth.  His teeth were Real, but he wasn’t.

3.   Does he pick up the check?  I say it over and over again.  If you are eating dinner/lunch with a potential investor and he/she doesn’t pick up the check, I can 99% guarantee that you will never get a penny out of them.  If they care so little about you that they cannot invest $50 for a meal, you ain’t getting their money.

4.   If he starts talking about “money coming in”, he’s not real.  Had this happen many times.  Someone talks about some bank deals or commissions that will be upcoming.  Walk away.  Don’t get your hopes up… it never closes.

5.   Is it too easy?  This is an interesting one.  If things seem to be going too easy, a red flag should pop up.  Closing money is not easy.  And if the guy doesn’t really look at your business plan or do his homework, chances are he doesn’t have the money to fund your project and he’s just pretending.

Here’s the key… You must research your prospective investor!

Tom Malloy goes on to say that he starts every meeting asking a prospective investor questions about himself or herself. He will never take a meeting without first taking time do the research. This means that he Googles his HNI and tries to find everything about the person he can.

Analyze all the information you’re given and your ratio of closing will increase dramatically!

The following action steps are designed to get you thinking about what’s possible.

How To Meet Rich People

  • While you’re on the networking kick, ask around your town and find out if anyone knows rich people. (Every town in America seems to have someone a little better off than the rest.)
  • Get a phone number and call them. Tell them you are a first time entrepreneur. See if they will meet for a few minutes so you can ask for advice. (Just ask for advice, not money!) Then as the months go by, try to cultivate a friendship.
  • Many busy business professionals will reject the initial meeting. If this happens try again. Be persistent without being annoying. After eight attempts, you can move on.

As long as you apply a little persistence, finding out how to meet rich people gets easier. You’ll be surprised who you can meet and what you’ll accomplish. As your relationships with successful people mature, these folks may someday introduce you to friends willing to get involved in your next project.

film finance guideBecause getting money for movies is a little more complicated than just asking for it, (we will discuss the Securities and Exchange Commission as well as Private Placement Memorandums in another lesson) — For now, let’s just set the business aside and simply focus on getting advice from a few new friends.

If you would like more information on how to meet rich people so you can finance your movie, check out Tom Malloy’s Film Fiance Guide.

Filmmaker David Allen Talks Modern Moviemaking and VOD Distribution

As we get closer to an independent filmmaking business driven by video on demand distribution, I am on the hunt for various case studies that can help filmmakers navigate the changing world.

I caught wind of an indie production company based in Australia called Rapidfire Productions. This is a production company that operates as a self sustaining modern moviemaking business. They develop, produce and distribute their genre specific titles through their own distribution arm. David W. Allen is one of the producers. Earlier this week he stopped by Filmmaking Stuff to share some ideas on how to make, market and sell movies through new forms of internet distribution.

Jason Brubaker
What is your name?

David W. Allen
David W. Allen

Jason Brubaker
How did you get started making movies?

David W. Allen
I have always been into making movies with my long time best friend and director of our most recent feature, “The Gates of Hell,” Kelly Dolen. As kids in our early teens we would always be running around with a video camera making home movies and writing our own horror and action screenplays.

Jason Brubaker
And then when you felt ready, you made the shift to features?

David W. Allen
Yes. Our first feature length film was a low low budget vampire flick called ‘Reign in Darkness’ which we both wrote and directed. We only had $49k to make this with and considering the budget it came out okay.

Jason Brubaker
Sounds like an exciting first feature.

David W. Allen
We jumped on a plane to LA wide eyed and innocent to sell our film and make it big in Hollywood.

Jason Brubaker
I felt the same way after our first feature. It’s like you work so hard to make the impossible, possible. Hollywood sure seems like the logical next step.

David W. Allen
Ahhhh how naive we were all those years ago. [Laughter]

Jason Brubaker
So what happened? Were you able to sell the movie for an amazing cash advance and get a 3 picture deal?

David W. Allen
We ended up getting a distribution deal with a sales agent who we were introduced to by an entertainment lawyer.

Jason Brubaker
Was it a good deal?

David W. Allen
No. We got ripped off and didn’t see a great deal of money for the film. That was 10 years ago. Today the title is still selling out there, online. The movie is making money for other people but not us.

Jason Brubaker
How did that change your perspective about traditional distribution?

David W. Allen
I learned a very valuable lesson with ‘Reign’ and vowed if we ever made another feature film we would distribute ourselves.

Jason Brubaker
I agree with you. Especially when it comes to video on demand distribution.

David W. Allen
I could see where the Internet was heading and knew it was going to be the way to reach our future audiences with our Independent films.

Jason Brubaker
What is Rapidfire Productions?

David W. Allen
Rapidifire Productions was established by Kelly Dolen and myself in 1999 with the sole purposed to produce a diverse, wide range of Independent high concept genre films, ranging from action, drama, horror and sci-fi.

Jason Brubaker
So you are staying very genre specific?

David W. Allen
Our long-term goal was to make commercially successful projects that satisfy a marketplace craving for intelligent genre films and build a distribution arm for low budget Indy films.

Jason Brubaker
And it sounds like your title called “The Gates Of Hell” fits your model. Tell us about the project.

David W. Allen
The Gates of Hell is a dark psychological thriller and horror flick which is inspired by a combination of “old school” films like The Exorcist and The Thing and the adrenalin of cutting edge video games like Gears of War and Manhunt.

Jason Brubaker
Could you tell our readers where to find out more about your movie?

David W. Allen
Here is the website: www.TheGatesOfHellMovie.com

Jason Brubaker
How did you come up with the idea?

David W. Allen
It was back when Kelly and I were sharing a place together and we were talking about what we can make next for a low cost and high commercial value. We were talking about a filmmaking seminar we attended in Melbourne, Australia conducted by Dov Simmens, a Hollywood indy filmmaking guru.

Jason Brubaker
I am familiar with Dov and his work. What was the most inspiring advice he gave you?

David W. Allen
He said the best thing to do with your first film is to get a bunch of young people and take them to a single location and chop them up.

Jason Brubaker
Ha! I think that is sound filmmaking business advice.

David W. Allen
That was the thought process that ignited the idea for The Gates of Hell.

Jason Brubaker
So once you had your idea, what came next?

David W. Allen
Kelly and I started brainstorming ideas and we come up with an old condemned orphanage that used to house discarded deformed children that upper class people didn’t want.

Jason Brubaker
That sounds like a true horror movie.

David W. Allen
We researched this online to see if in fact a place like this did exist and they did back in the early 1940’s. And then we added some Hollywood to the idea and the first treatment was written.

Jason Brubaker
So once you had the treatment, what came next in your process?

David W. Allen
From there Kelly ran with the idea and developed it into a screenplay which was constantly developed over some years to get it to a stage where it was ready to make. We had a local artist drawing characters for the film and story boards you name it was all happening.

Jason Brubaker
What was your role during this time?

David W. Allen
I focused on the producing and marketing. I was responsible for developing an internet marketing strategy, building the website and creating the entire online distribution business model. I planned an online release from the very beginning.

Jason Brubaker
Building your movie business plan based on an internet marketing strategy is a very new concept. Was there any pushback from other producers or investors?

David W. Allen
The Investors had no intention of going down this path. They wanted the big blue sky and Hollywood. But I knew in the end they would end up going with my plan to self-distribute.

Jason Brubaker
What was Kelly’s role?

David W. Allen
Kelly went out and raised the large majority of the money from investors of our previous film and the new investors came from people he knew from his years selling home audio equipment at the large retailer JB HI-FI. The main investors were customers of Kelly’s from this store and over the years they come to value him as a friend more than just a shop assistant.

Jason Brubaker
So would you say that filmmakers must first understand the value of relationships?

David W. Allen
There is such a valuable lesson to be learned here especially with the social networking explosion on the Internet… Success is all about the relationships both online and offline.

Jason Brubaker
That makes me remember a quote I learned while selling overpriced hot tubs in college. “People buy from people they trust and like.”

David W. Allen
In my opinion this is the key to being successful in offline and online business and film distribution. Over time your followers will come to trust you and believe you, so when you have something to sell they will be far more likely to buy because they feel like they know and trust you.

Jason Brubaker
So let’s talk more about your movie sales strategy. How did you handle the sales, marketing and distribution?

David W. Allen
After the film was completed we took the film to a number of film festivals such as Screamfest, Amberg, Sacramento, and NYC. We also attended some film markets such as AFM and Cannes.

Jason Brubaker
Were you able to gain any traction?

David W. Allen
The film had great reviews but with all the positive hype around the the film the distribution deals were not very favorable and we didn’t want to go down the same path as we did with our first film ‘Reign in Darkness’ where were got a raw distribution deal.

Jason Brubaker
That is a tough choice. Many first time feature filmmakers will consider deals that do not pay a dime, just for the validation that comes from someone else saying “Great work! You’re a REAL filmmaker!”

David W. Allen
Yeah. But being passionate about everything Internet, I was pushing the proposal of just self-distributing online. But it was a hard sell to our investors who wanted to see the film in cinemas and up in lights.

Jason Brubaker
That is interesting. I guess some of those folks need traditional validation too?

David W. Allen
Well, all I wanted was to see a positive net return for sales of the film and focus on introducing the film to its market online and letting its popularity spread over time.

Jason Brubaker
Sounds like a pragmatic approach to your modern movie business. Were you able to get your way?

David W. Allen
I managed to get my way in the end with a little compromise. The investors wanted to see the movie in the cinemas so we did a distribution deal with an Australian distributor for Australian and New Zealand rights.

Jason Brubaker
Sounds like a hybrid deal. You retain some rights, while licensing other rights through other channels. Was this a profitable strategy for your movie?

David W. Allen
As I am writing this, the distributor is still yet to do anything with ‘The Gates of Hell’, which is no surprise to me, but a big lesson for the investors who wanted a quick return and blue sky.

Jason Brubaker
At least you can move forward with your own internet movie marketing strategy. Can you tell us a little more about your marketing plan?

David W. Allen
My marketing plan is simple. With very little money, I am taking the advice of a brilliant marketer Seth Godin and build a tribe and sell the movie to that tribe who over time will spread the word.

Jason Brubaker
What are the mechanics involved in building a tribe?

David W. Allen
I will be collecting emails from prospective customers so we can sell them backend products that they actually want.

Jason Brubaker
What about marketplaces? Where will you actually sell your movie?

David W. Allen
My distribution plan is to start off with selling the DVD then when I get some traction in the market I will approach a VOD distributor and then an iTunes aggregator and Amazon. I will also look at Netflix but I will wait until it gets more popularity so to get a better upfront fee.

Jason Brubaker
You mentioned DVD. Who is going to handle your DVD fulfillment?

David W. Allen
For the DVD distribution I use a company called Disk.com. They were highly recommended to me by some of my Internet marketing peers who use them to create and distribute their information products. They are based in the USA and is a great place for the shipping of the DVDs within the US and throughout Europe and the UK. There are some great companies here in Australia but the shipping costs would be way too high given our main market is in the USA and UK.

Jason Brubaker
Outside of distribution and your website, how are you spreading word of mouth?

David W. Allen
Facebook Pages and Twitter play a bit part in my strategy. I use these platforms to build what is called Market Leadership. I also hit the forums and get involved in the top ones and this is a great way to get people to check out the film.

Jason Brubaker
What about getting prominent website owners to review the movie?

David W. Allen
I am sending out copies to influences in the market place, people who already have a large following in the horror market and if they like the film they will tell their tribe about it.

Jason Brubaker
When I first saw your movie website, I was impressed. I think it has all the components necessary to create a movie sales funnel. But you also have something called an opt-in box to build your mailing list. How important is a mailing list for modern moviemakers?

David W. Allen
Very important! It is such a valuable asset for filmmaker if they don’t abuse it. It takes so long to build traffic to your website so you want to be capturing as many leads as possible so you can stay in touch with them, send them cool free stuff and then sell them backend products related to their film.

Jason Brubaker
Yes. I think filmmakers need to take charge of sourcing their own core audience. But what about in-between projects? How do you leverage your list?

David W. Allen
Between projects, the other thing filmmakers can do is introduce other people’s related products to their list for a fee or on an affiliate basis. Over time your mailing list will become very valuable. The bigger and more responsive the list, the more other industry players will want to pay filmmakers money to get related products or films in front of their subscribers.

Jason Brubaker
What suggestions do you have for other filmmakers who want to create their own movie business?

David W. Allen
Look at the market you’re making the film for first. This is a business and if you are going to spend money on making a film you better be sure there is a big enough and hungry enough market out there to buy your film and other backend products.

Jason Brubaker
You keep mentioning marketing related products. Could you explain this a little more?

David W. Allen
I look at the film itself as a lead generation product for the purpose of building a big list. I am not all that concerned about making the money back on the DVD itself but on other monetizing avenues over time including advertising.

Jason Brubaker
That is an interesting concept. Most filmmakers do not think like marketers. Yet if we want to make money making movies, it makes sense that we would need to diversify our product offerings.

David W. Allen
The modern filmmaker needs to think beyond the film itself as the only means of generating income. The money online is where the eyeballs are. Think about it.

– – –

Find out more about how to sell your movie.

Increase Web Traffic | Sell Your Movie PT 6

Life Stats for a zombie movie websiteAs a filmmakers, getting your movie seen and selling  has become incredibly challenging. If you’ve been following filmmaking stuff over the last year, you know that one of the major issues we are trying to solve is this question: In a world where DVD sales are non-existent (because there are no more DVD sales outlets), then how can filmmakers make enough VOD sales to justify a budget?

In an effort to solve this filmmaking problem, today we will cover step 6 of this 7 part series on how to sell your movie on iTunes, Amazon and Netflix for Maximum Profit.

Increase Targeted Web Traffic

To increase your website traffic, you might decide to work out Search Engine Optimization tactics with your web marketer, pay for online or off-line advertising, or incorporate a bit of everything. Unpaid traffic is called organic. Organic traffic is the best kind because whenever you pay for a customer, you diminish your profit margin from the outset. So obviously, the goal for all movie marketers is to acquire a customer for the very lowest price possible.

One secret I utilize is frequent press release submissions. Years ago, it was advised that you only wrote and submitted press releases when you had something newsworthy to say. But these days, in addition to targeting traditional news outlets, most press releases are included in search engine results. Without getting overly technical, this means for a very small amount of money, submitting one press release complete with links to your website can increase your web footprint.

Over time these releases are picked up by blogs and other websites hungry for related content. And the resulting benefit is more awareness of your movie, for a minimal cost.

If both your traffic and your budget are low, search out other filmmakers who have successfully sold their movies to a similar market and find out if they would be interested in promoting your movie to their mailing list. Assuming your movie is congruent with what their audience enjoys, these other filmmakers may gladly help you out for a cut of the profits. I have found that giving affiliates a good return for effective marketing creates long term win-win business relationships. These other filmmakers are able to create a stream of revenue between their movie projects. And you benefit by expanding your movie’s reach quickly.

This is also a good time to revisit those sites from your initial research. Compile a list of one-hundred target websites, then reach out to site owners and kindly ask if they would be interested in reviewing your movie. Regardless of whether or not these folks like your movie, what is secondarily valuable to you are links back to your website. Over time, these back-links, combined with your trailer and social networking profiles will serve to funnel more and more prospective viewers back to your website. And the cycle continues…

For more information on how to market and sell your movie, visit www.HowToSellYourMovie.com

Movie Sales Funnel | Sell Your Movie PT 4

Layers of a typical sales funnel.

Image via Wikipedia

Filmmaking is changing. Like it or not, if you want to make a living making movies, you need to learn about the business side of independent movie making. And if this is your first time on filmmaking stuff, you are reading step 4 of a 7 part series on How To Sell Your Movie On iTunes, Amazon and Netflix For Maximum Profit.

So picking up where we left off, once you have sharpened your hook and targeted your target audience, and set up shop in the popular VOD marketplaces, your next step is to create a movie sales funnel.

Step 4 of 7 – Create Your Movie Sales Funnel

To set up an internet movie sales funnel, you will have to modify your website to funnel all traffic towards a sale. This can be achieved easily by removing all the potentially distracting content from your site including production photos, press kits and actor bios. Once removed, further emphasis should be placed on your trailer, your about page, and most importantly, your “buy now” buttons.

Most of your visitors will exit your website and never return. So to increase your odds of converting these visitors into paying customers, you will want to create ways to capture visitor contact information. One easy way is by creating a Facebook page for your movie and then placing a Facebook link on your site. This way, once your visitor joins your movie’s Facebook community, the added social proof of like-minded fans touting the joys of your movie may increase your sales. This goes for Twitter and other social networking communities too.

But because many social networking sites run the risk of going out of vogue, you will want to migrate your fans off the social networks and get them into your own mailing list. For this, I recommend using a third-party email marketing service such as Aweber.  Aweber provides ease of service. As soon as you sign up for one of their inexpensive accounts, you can easily create a way for your fans to connect with you. For example, if you would like over $47 dollars in FREE filmmaking tools simply enter your info into my Awber opt in box below.


If you just signed up, you will get an email. You will need to first, confirm your subscription. After you confirmed, you probably noticed how you were redirected to a “Thank You Page.” And on that page you were able to download all sorts of premium filmmaking tools, for free.

This is called permission based marketing. Because I have built some trust with you, you decided to give me permission to send you useful filmmaking information. While I am obviously utilizing list-building to create a more meaningful relationship with filmmakers (and YOU), this model can be (and should be) applied to your own movie business. But instead of giving away filmmaking books and audio courses, you might consider allowing your prospective movie audience to download a free movie soundtrack.

The reason why I stress Audience List Building so much in my Filmmaking model is because no matter what happens in distribution, the size of your targeted audience list  (a community of people who know you and your work) – this will determine your rate of success over your long-term career. Don’t let anyone tell you differently.

Three Tips for building your Audience List:

  1. From now on, as soon as you have a website, start buiding your list.
  2. Put your website on your business card.
  3. Collect names and email addresses at film festivals.

Companies like Aweber allow you to manage your email communication with thousands of fans. And since reputable email companies have good relationships with internet service providers, the odds of your movie newsletter ending up in spam folders is decreased.

[box style=”notice”] For more information on how to market and sell your movie, visit www.HowToSellYourMovie.com[/box]