How to apply “show, don’t tell” in screenplays

I have a fairly large collection of “pitching sessions from hell” stories, but there was one that stands out because I blew it—afterward. This was early in my career, and actually the pitching session itself went great. The executive loved the idea and commissioned a script for a TV movie. How to apply “show, don’t tell” in screenplays…

How To Deal With Filmmaking Rejection

One way I mitigate this “all eggs in one basket” approach to filmmaking (and business) is to always have projects in various stages of development. This allows you to check one rejection off the list and put your focus into the next. And just because one prospective investor rejects one opportunity, there is nothing stopping you from shopping around…

Filmmaking Seminar Los Angeles

orange_registernow

For Los Angeles based fimmakers looking to take their show to business, I recommend checking out the next Norman Berns workshop. In this full-day, hands-on instruction, you will gain experience on scheduling, budgeting, business plans, ptiching, fundraising and distribution.

The Secret To Filmmaking Success

Could you go to “networking events” and try to find folks to help introduce you to the appropriate contact? Yes. But just as easily you could pick up the phone, call your prospective contact’s place of business and try to get him or her on the phone to make your pitch.

5 tips to push forward with your indie filmmaking project

Serious indie filmmakers stop at noting until the movie is actually in the can – or these days – in your hard drive. Still if you’ve been working to make movies for any length of time, you know there are days when you hit obstacles, sometimes so seemingly insurmountable that you just want to give up on your project. Don’t do it!

Leverage Your Following | Sell Your Movie PT 7

Klk-IR3s

One of the most important filmmaking strategies you must adopt in this era of modern moviemaking is a long term perspective. In years past, filmmakers focused on making one movie, selling it and then moving on to the next movie.

Filmmaking Stuff News For 2011 Early

Since publishing the modern moviemaking manifesto, some of you have written, requesting an online community where you can share ideas with other filmmakers involved in our movement. So I have taken the initial steps to creating the modern moviemaking community. If you want to be among the first to know about it (because it’s exclusive), make sure you get on the list.

Traditional Filmmaking Is Dead: Rise of The Backyard Indie

While nobody wants to make movies for pocket change, many filmmakers still believe we can somehow continually produce unprofitable (movie) products and expect the money and the subsequent jobs to keep rolling in. And unlike years past, filmmakers can no longer approach investors with the cliche pitch: “Filmmaking is a risky investment – if we are lucky, we might win Sundance and get a deal.” Now, with transparent distribution options availabe to all filmmakers, that line of give-me-money reasoning is reckless, no longer applicable, and in my opinion, unethical.

Filmmaking Tips You Can Use Today To Prosper

If you’re filmmaker seeking practical filmmaking tips you can use TODAY, I’d like so share some thoughts with you. The world of filmmaking is changing. Producing content is getting cheaper. And distribution outlets are becoming increasingly accessible. While these changes have not fully hit mainstream Hollywood, you can rest assured that it’s only a matter of time until the ripple effect has a leveling impact.