The Secret Society Of Modern Indie Filmmakers

Earlier this week, Sheri Candler was spreading word of mouth about a test screening of Gary King’s indie film musical:  How Do You Write A Joe Schermann Song. So I did something I haven’t done for awhile – I got out from behind my computer screen to meet and mingle with some new filmmakers face-to-face.

As the lights dimmed and Gary’s movie flickered across the screen, I was reminded of the year I lived in New York City. This was a time when I couch surfed between a sofa and an inflatable air mattress, all the while dreaming that I would someday make movies. Admittedly, maybe these memories were flooding back as a result of Gary’s movie. I mean, the story is based in Manhattan.

During the screening, and afterwards, I realized I have been missing something I haven’t felt for years.

I have forgotten the joy that comes from participating in activities with other folks from the indie filmmaking community. And I also realized that my world of indie filmmaking (once defined and limited by the following filmmaking mantra): save up all summer and buy an Arri BL, scrape together enough money to pay for film and processing, make the movie and PRAY for a distribution deal that makes sense – I’m pleased to say that era of filmmaking is over.

As a result of lower priced production equipment, coupled with new, non-discriminatory distribution, YOU can make, market and sell your movie this year and you don’t need to ask permission. Filmmakers like Gary King epitomize this movement – asking questions like How do you write a Joe Schermann Song starring awesome actress Christina Rose (nice work Christina!)

Past that, there is something else. While the studios are excited about UltraViolet and a new attempt to control their piece of the world wide web, our thriving indie community could care less. Instead of worrying about traditional distribution, modern movie makers are more concerned with their YouTube following – and the size of their growing audience.

As a filmmaker, you are part of movie making history. And you probably don’t know it. But like all artistic and social movements that have come before, you are riding this wave. The question is, will you take advantage of this opportunity – or will you find yet another reason why you can’t make your movie this year?

ALSO:

At the screening, I met close to a dozen people who claimed to have heard of me or knew me from this website. Please give me some time to adjust socially – It’s not every day that people approach me and quote my ideas back to me… But I want you to know I am honored and grateful for your readership.

This is usually the part in the article where I ask you to sign up for my newsletter.

Apps for Filmmakers

apps for filmmakersAs a filmmaker, we thought you’d enjoy Filmmaking Stuff on your handheld device.

As a result, we have created a filmmaking app that will help modern movie makers take action and get their movies made.

“In an effort to create useful iPhone apps for filmmakers, The Filmmaking Stuff App has been launched today. The app will help take filmmaking out of Hollywood, and put it into the hands of filmmakers, literally.”

To visit apps for filmmakers, and to get the official Filmmaking Stuff app, click here.

Sell Your Movie For Maximum Profit

If you’re already a seasoned feature filmmaker, take a moment and think back: Do you remember when the idea of making movies seemed like a far away dream?

Do you remember when you first got the idea for your movie? Do you remember Your first day of production? Do you remember your first screening and how well everyone loved your work?

That happened to me with my first feature. Like you, I thought our movie would get into Sundance, play well, build buzz and if we were really lucky, we had hoped the movie would garner us a 3 picture deal. But that didn’t happen.

Sure, we got some offers, but they were not “deals.” (A deal actually pays money!)

So instead of exchanging our movie for an empty promise, we decided to try selling our movie on the internet. Little did I know, this one decision has changed the course of my movie making life. That was five years ago…

And since that time, the internet as evolved. If you’re a filmmaker with a movie, you need to get it selling in all the popular internet marketplaces, including Amazon and iTunes.

You don’t need a middle-man to make this profitable. I am going to show you my internet marketing secrets…

You can check out my “How To Sell Your Movie” system by visiting the website here.

Filmmaking Goals for 2010

Jason Brubaker writes

Jason Brubaker writes

OK. With the holiday season right around the corner, a lot of productions will go on hiatus until after the New Year. And it’s during the pending downtime when you should start thinking about your filmmaking goals for 2010.

You see, as movie makers, each new year gives us time to reflect on past accomplishments and future goals. Here is a year anew exercise. Take a few minutes to seriously answer these 5 questions:

  1. What did you achieve last year? Did you make any movies or work on any projects? Did you write anything?
  2. What sorts of filmmaking stuff did you want to achieve, but didn’t? What obstacles got in your way?
  3. What do you want to accomplish in 2010?
  4. What sorts of obstacles must you overcome to reach your filmmaking goals? How will you do this?
  5. What is one thing you can complete today that will put you one step closer?

As a filmmaker, I assume your primary goal is to make movies. But as you know, making a movie requires many steps. So to plan your next movie as well as some of the other big whoppers you wish to accomplish, I suggest breaking your goals into smaller and smaller chunks… And then finally break them into small enough chunks so you can include them in your list of daily tasks.

For example, lets say the big goal is to hire an up-and-coming Director of Photography. Some daily tasks you might accomplish:

  1. Call friends of friends for recommendations.
  2. Put ad on Criag’s List seeking DP (or one of the many sites.)
  3. Review Demo Reels.
  4. Call prospective DP’s for interview or lunch.
  5. Meet and negotiate terms the work within your budget.

Remember, as a filmmaker, nothing of major significance happens unless you have a clear understanding of your goals. And big goals always consist of smaller tasks.