Time to Make A Movie

When I was starting my filmmaking career, an industry veteran told me to put blinders on, focus and go for it. And with this advice, he also mentioned the importance of a clearly written plan. If you have been taking baby steps towards the realization of your movie, then sooner or later it will be time to make a movie.

When you have all the filmmaking stuff you need, you are no longer operating from theory and planning… You are now in action mode! You will probably need to modify your initial, ideal schedule for the real world realities of production. When it is time to make a movie, you will firm up shoot dates and call times.

Time to Make A Movie

It is at this point in the moviemaking process when most filmmakers get the brilliant idea to just shoot the movie on the weekends, spanning a few months. As a potential upside to the weekend strategy, you may have less scheduling conflicts. You might also score some great deals on rental equipment. But if not managed well, weekend shooting can slow the momentum of your project.

Figure out when you can begin production. The time of the year will impact on your budget. Hot weather will require different provisions than cold weather. And how will rain can potentially wash out your shooting schedule. Do you have a pan B? How about a plan C?

While finding an experienced 1st AD or Line Producer will help you figure out the best game plan for your show, it is possible that you will want to complete an initial schedule on your own. For this, I recommend our sponsor, Lightspeed EPS – It is an online production management tool that allows you to schedule your movie and coordinate with crew.

How To Break Down and Schedule Your No-Budget Movie

If you’re a first time feature filmmaker, you do not need a gazillion dollars to join the feature club. But you will need to learn how to replace money with ginormous creatively. And once your screenplay is complete, then the next step in the filmmaking process is your initial breakdown and schedule.

Breaking down the script means you go through your screenplay, number each scene and highlight each element, including locations, characters, props, make up, wardrobe, picture vehicles and special FX…

All of these things cost money. And once the script is locked, any modification you make to the story or schedule, no matter how minor or major, will subsequently impact the budget.

My producer friend Forrest Murray always says the script, schedule and budget are the same document. You’ll need all three to make a movie… But in the process, if you change one document, you’re actually changing all three.

I’ll chat about this some more later. For today, let’s focus on your initial schedule so you can eventually get to your budget.

Schedule Your Movie And Save

1.After you highlight each element, you’ll want to figure out when you want to shoot your movie and how long you plan to shoot.

2.You can determine this by choosing how many pages you want to shoot per day. Then you can decide if you want to shoot 5 days on and 2 days off, or 6 days on and 1 day off. Or maybe you want to shoot your movie over a few weekends.

3.Everything in the script will impact your budget. There is software for this. Final Draft offers an add-on called Tagger. Tagger allows you to go through the script and pick out elements and highlight them in various colors. Once all elements are selected, you can eventually import this list into your budget and schedule software program.

4.After giving this your best effort, if you still feel stuck, seek expert advice.

5.Eventually, these elements will have a price in your initial budget. What is the price of each element? How much does your movie cost?

Many motion picture professionals make a living just breaking down, scheduling and budgeting movies. So it’s a pretty complicated and creative area. As a first time feature filmmaker, it save you many headaches if you partner with an seasoned 1st AD or Line Producer who could guide you through the process.

If this is not possible for you, I suggest reading every article on the subject as well as watching every YouTube video. This will teach you how to think like a cost conscious, responsible producer.

Regardless of your decision to complete your own breakdown or hire someone else for the job, the reason you’ll need an initial schedule is because this will give you a good starting point… You’ll utilize this information to figure out your budget. You’ll also be able to figure out if you need to cut an element or two, or not.

Cut Your Budget

Once you have your initial schedule, (and assuming this is your first feature), I suggest you create a budget for your movie in the neighborhood of $500K. Before you go crazy thinking this is a lot of money (or a little money), I want you to know you don’t actually have to spend $500K in hard cash to meet the needs of your budget.

In fact, once you determine you’ll make your movie at $500K, you are going to spend the next few weeks working backwards to see how much hard cash you can replace with sweat equity, discounts and favors from friends and family. Why $500K? Because if you actually have the elements budgeted, there is a good chance your movie will look better than if you budgeted for a mere $50K.

The reason for this is mostly psychological. By setting your budget at 500K, you’re going to start out with goal that forces you to get a higher production value than if you simply settled for pocket cash.

Later, with the application of tremendous creativity, it will be possible to reduce a $500K budget after discounts, free food, locations and salary adjustments quite significantly.

Do you have friends who own locations you can utilize for free? Do you have access to discounted equipment? Can you finish your movie faster than scheduled?

Do you have a friend with an edit suite?

Can you shoot some scenes outside during the day to reduce the need for extra lights? Can you find free food for your cast and crew? These are just some of the ways you can reduce that $500K budget.

One of my buddies was able to do this on the cheap. He had a location budgeted for $5K. However, after my buddy spoke with the owner of the location, the fee was reduced to zero. How? My buddy (a creative producer) agreed to shoot a promo for the owner’s business. Another filmmaker friend got free food for his entire shoot simply by asking.

The food supplier was thanked in the credits.

Deals like this happen. But it takes creativity to find opportunity. Here are some questions to ask:

How much money do I have?
How can I reduce expenses?
Can I get free food?
Who do I know who has the location I’m looking for?
How much money will I need?

The other reason you want to keep your first feature budget low is to allow greater opportunity for return. In the event you get a standard distribution deal (which is becoming more and more rare), your movie should look expensive.

If your budget is $500K and the movie looks like $500K, but you only spent $50K or $30K $15K in ultra-low-budget hard cash, and someone pays you back your budget, then you just made a crazy profit!

Nice work.

And in the event you do not get a standard distribution deal, then you’re not quite as deep in the financial hole as you otherwise would be.

Film Scheduling

For those of you considering producing your first feature, hiring a good 1st Assistant director is an invaluable part of the process. Why? Well a 1st AD is in charge of taking your screenplay, breaking it down and providing the initial schedule. That information is later used to budget your movie. And the budget is used in your business plan – which is used to attract potential movie investors.

Break Down and Schedule
Breaking down the script means you go through your screenplay, number each scene and highlight each element, including locations, characters, props, make up, wardrobe, picture vehicles and special FX…

All of these things cost money. And once the script is locked, any modification you make to the story or schedule, no matter how minor or major, will subsequently impact the budget.

If money is tight, you might consider performing your own breakdown long before you bring on a 1st AD. If you go this route, I suggest doing a web search for Gorilla Film Production Software or Movie Magic (formerly branded as Entertainment Partners). With these tools, you’ll have some help as you break down and schedule your movie.

In the event you want some more information about the mechanics of script breakdown and film scheduling, my very accomplished movie industry friend Peter Marshall has put together one heck of an online course. I have included a video below that provides more detail.

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If you’re interested in learning more about Peter D. Marshall’s Script Breakdown and Film Scheduling Course For Indie Filmmakers, you can CLICK HERE or just bookmark this page for a later time. Additionally, if you know other filmmakers who might benefit from Peter’s insight, spread the word by clicking on one of those little buttons below.