The Secret Society Of Modern Indie Filmmakers

Earlier this week, Sheri Candler was spreading word of mouth about a test screening of Gary King’s indie film musical:  How Do You Write A Joe Schermann Song. So I did something I haven’t done for awhile – I got out from behind my computer screen to meet and mingle with some new filmmakers face-to-face.

As the lights dimmed and Gary’s movie flickered across the screen, I was reminded of the year I lived in New York City. This was a time when I couch surfed between a sofa and an inflatable air mattress, all the while dreaming that I would someday make movies. Admittedly, maybe these memories were flooding back as a result of Gary’s movie. I mean, the story is based in Manhattan.

During the screening, and afterwards, I realized I have been missing something I haven’t felt for years.

I have forgotten the joy that comes from participating in activities with other folks from the indie filmmaking community. And I also realized that my world of indie filmmaking (once defined and limited by the following filmmaking mantra): save up all summer and buy an Arri BL, scrape together enough money to pay for film and processing, make the movie and PRAY for a distribution deal that makes sense – I’m pleased to say that era of filmmaking is over.

As a result of lower priced production equipment, coupled with new, non-discriminatory distribution, YOU can make, market and sell your movie this year and you don’t need to ask permission. Filmmakers like Gary King epitomize this movement – asking questions like How do you write a Joe Schermann Song starring awesome actress Christina Rose (nice work Christina!)

Past that, there is something else. While the studios are excited about UltraViolet and a new attempt to control their piece of the world wide web, our thriving indie community could care less. Instead of worrying about traditional distribution, modern movie makers are more concerned with their YouTube following – and the size of their growing audience.

As a filmmaker, you are part of movie making history. And you probably don’t know it. But like all artistic and social movements that have come before, you are riding this wave. The question is, will you take advantage of this opportunity – or will you find yet another reason why you can’t make your movie this year?

ALSO:

At the screening, I met close to a dozen people who claimed to have heard of me or knew me from this website. Please give me some time to adjust socially – It’s not every day that people approach me and quote my ideas back to me… But I want you to know I am honored and grateful for your readership.

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Indie PMD With Jon Reiss and Sheri Candler

Jon Reiss and Sheri Candler stopped by Filmmaking Stuff a few months back to discuss the  new role of the indie PMD. For those of you who aren’t aware of the term – PMD stands for producer of marketing and distribution. It’s a phrase Jon Reiss coined in his filmmaking book called Think Outside the Box Office.

The feedback was so awesome, that I decided to have the interview transcribed. And in text form, it comes out to over 20 pages of useful filmmaking information.

If you’re a modern moviemaker – heck, it doesn’t matter if you’re a film student or a working professional, the content in this interview is recommended reading for all filmmakers. While I think it’s worth a gazillion bucks, I decided to simply give it away! To get your complementary copy of the Jon Reiss and Sheri Candler interview by Jason Brubaker, click here  >>

Happy Filmmaking!

Jon Reiss and Sheri Candler talk Movie Marketing and Distribution

Traditional independent filmmaking is changing. In years past, the independent movie business was defined by a filmmaker’s ability to find a script, locate movie investors, raise the necessary money, make the movie and (hopefully) land an awesome distribution deal – and then live happily ever after.

At least that was the dream.

But these days, the entire model of indie filmmaking has gone Topsy-Turvy. Nobody knows this better than Jon Reiss and Sheri Candler. Both are on the cutting edge of independent movie marketing and distribution.

Earlier this week, Sheri Candler and Jon Reiss stopped by Filmmaking Stuff to share some ideas on how filmmakers can think outside the box office. You can download This Filmmaking Stuff Podcast

Jon Reiss has produced and directed three features films and has been named one of “10 Digital Directors to Watch” by Daily Variety. Based on his experience, Jon Reiss wrote “Think Outside the Box Office: The Ultimate Guide to Film Distribution in the Digital Era.” This book has gained international acclaim. Check out: Think Outside The Box Office

Sheri Candler is an inbound marketing strategist who helps independent filmmakers build identities for themselves and their films. Through the use of online tools such as social networking, podcasts, blogs, online media publications and radio, she assists filmmakers in building an engaged and robust online community for their work that can be used to monetize effectively. To find out more about Sheri Candler’s independent movie marketing services, visit her website here: Sheri Candler Movie Marketing website.

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