Filmmaking Stuff Book

Grab Your Copy Of Filmmaking Stuff So You Can Take Action And Make Your Movie Now!

Are you looking for filmmaking books? As a filmmaker, one of the biggest problems YOU have is finding a way to get your movie made, seen and sold without waiting for some Hollywood yahoo to give you permission. And as you probably know, there are a lot of people who want to make movies. But very few people will actually take action.

The good news is this. You no longer need Hollywood. In fact, the future of filmmaking is not Hollywood. It is the thousands of independent filmmakers empowered by the digital revolution.

This filmmaking book shows YOU how to get the script, use crowdfunding to raise the money, make the journey from screenplay to screen, distribute your movie, and then build an audience eager to see your next movie!

Engaging and enthusiastic, Jason Brubaker has written an excellent introduction to the new landscape of filmmaking – especially for those just starting out their careers.

Jon Reiss, author of “Think Outside The Box Office”
www.JonReiss.com

Filmmaking Stuff shows you how to make, market and sell your movie!

What makes this filmmaking book different than the gazillion other filmmaking books in your collection?

For starters, if you are looking for more information on 3-point lighting or how to set up dolly track, this is not the book for you! While all that how-to technical stuff is essential for physical production – unless you have an understanding of how to actually get money, market and then sell your movie – good luck!

Finding out how to leverage new tools such as crowdfunding, social media, internet marketing for filmmakers and modern movie distribution are essential for the modern moviemaker. And in the event you want to make more than one movie in your career, this filmmaking book is for you!

There are lots of books that tell you the technical aspects of how to make a movie. This one answers the question you’ll face when it’s done: ‘Now what?’ If you care about having people actually pay to see your movie, get this book.

Jurgen Wolff, author of “Your Writing Coach”
www.ScreenwritingSuccess.com

Who should get this book?

  • Grab your copy of filmmaking stuff if you are sick of waiting for someone else to discover your talent!
  • Grab this filmmaking book if you are ready to take action and make your movie now!
  • Grab this filmmaking book if you want to understand how to leverage crowdfunding to raise money and find an audience!
  • Grab this filmmaking book if you want to find out about new methods in marketing and film distribution!
  • Grab this filmmaking book if you want to make, market and sell your movie without the middle-man!

If you want to make movies, now is the time to take action! This book is a must read for serious filmmakers!

Check out this video on why you must add Filmmaking Stuff to your collection of filmmaking books:

Filmmaking Stuff gives filmmakers a rare insight into how to make a feature film with a proven step-by-step formula from an indie filmmaker who has ‘been-there-done-that-and got the T-shirt.’ Not only does Jason Brubaker understand the business and creative side of filmmaking, he is also an expert in using the Internet and Social Media to finance and distribute any film today. This fact alone is reason enough to always have this book sitting beside your computer.

Peter D. Marshall, Filmmaker
www.ActionCutPrint.com

What is included in this book?

Chapter 1 Modern Movie Business
Right now, with or without Hollywood, you have the opportunity to make movies and reach your audience globally! If you want to take advantage of this opportunity, NOW is the day when you stop dreaming and start DOING! Learn this stuff and you’ll never go back to your old movie making ideas!

Chapter 2 Create Your Story
You are now competing with filmmakers across the globe who are flooding the market with garbage. To be successful, you need to have a great, marketable screenplay. Something that you can quickly pitch to prospective investors and collaborators and have them say: “That’s an awesome idea for a movie!”

Chapter 3 Get Movie Money
Go from story to budget. You will also find out how to communicate with prospective investors in their language. You will also find tips on how to leverage crowdfunding and social networks to get money.

Chapter 4 Manufacture Your Movie
To start a small business, all you need is an idea, some start up cash, raw material, production and a customer base – and a way to sell whatever it is you created. Non-discriminatory distribution allows you to create movies from anywhere in the world and reach your audience.

Chapter 5 Marketing and Distribution
With DVD sales down, utilization of middle-men like sales agents and distribution companies is changing. The ripple effect means that you will need to create your own marketing, sales and distribution strategy.

Jason personally guides you through the many important things you need to know to create a great film. This book has exceptional tips for saving money and marketing.

Carole Dean, author of “Art of Funding Second Edition”
www.FromTheHeartProductions.com

A real page turner. This is a must read for any filmmaker who does not enjoy being suckered by middlemen.

Kim Callahan, Hollywood Talent Manager

A lot of people want to make movies. But most people never will. Hollywood is changing. So unless you are willing to find out how to source your audience and market directly, it will be very difficult to make a career making movies. This book provides you with the steps on how to get your movie made, seen and sold.

Speaking from his own hard won experience, Jason lays out a comprehensive plan to help the modern indie filmmaker get films made. If you care more about making good movies and telling good stories, than about being Hollywood, let Filmmaking Stuff show you the way.

Gordon Firemark, Entertainment Attorney
www.firemark.com

If you are a filmmaker who wants to make your own movies, and make a career making movies, then this filmmaking book is for you. Filmmaking Stuff will provide you with insights on how to raise money, how to build a team, how to build buzz around your movie and finally, how to sell your movie.

The process of script to distribution is now much more complicated and labor intensive. Producers must wear even more hats on the job and be much more knowledgeable about the business of film than they once were. Fortunately, Jason has written this book to help educate and inspire producers of this new century to take advantage of the wonderful tools the internet has given us all to reach audiences worldwide.

Sheri Candler, Marketing and Publicity Specialist
www.shericandler.com

If you want to make movies, if you already make movies and want to sell them, if you already sell movies and want to make more money, you owe yourself a few hours with Jason’s newest book. It has the potential to change everything for you. I don’t know anyone who knows (and appreciates) indie DIY filmmaking better than Jason. ‘Filmmaking Stuff’ is packed with solid knowhow; it’s that one serious tool that indies need.

Norman C. Berns, Producer/Director
www.reelgrok.com

Should You Go To Film School?

If you’re just starting out as a filmmaker, deciding if you should attend a traditional film school is something you need to decide. And it’s a costly decision – some of my friends here in Los Angeles are over fifty-thousand dollars in debt.

While most of my friends value having a college education, all agree that having a  film school degree will not guarantee success in Hollywood. Like any industry, becoming successful requires passion, commitment and hard work.

Last year, I was introduced to filmmaker Seth Hymes. When he was in high school, he worked as Production Assistant, Sound Tech and an Editor. After high school, he went off to film school. In fact, he graduated from NYU with honors. From there, he was an editor for Fox News Channel and also managed to get two features into production.

So I sat down with Seth and asked him some questions about his experience.

Jason Brubaker
Seth. After visiting your website and chatting, you seem to have an interesting perspective on formal film school education. What are your thoughts? Is there any value in film school?

Seth Hymes
No, there isn’t. And it’s a great question. What does “value” mean? It means that something adds merit or worth to your life for a reasonable cost. A lot of people say things like “you learn the basics” and it’s a “good place to experiment”.

Jason Brubaker
So in your experience, you think film school is over priced?

Seth Hymes
Well, in film school, you write a check for $100,000. In return, they give you a $2,000 video camera and tell you how to push the on button. Are you going to learn something? Sure. Is it valuable? No. There is no value in learning basic technical concepts for an obscene mark up in cost.

Jason Brubaker
In the past, students enrolled in film school because held the promise of networking, as well as access to equipment. You’re saying this sort of stuff is no longer relevant?

Seth Hymes
The 3 main “values” of film school are no longer relevant. They are, access to equipment, lessons in filmmaking craft and connections. In the 60s, 70s, and 80s, when people like Lucas, Scorsese, and Spike Lee went to film school, it was probably a good investment. You couldn’t just pick up a high quality HD camera and start shooting. Filmmaking equipment cost a ton of money and was hard to find. You really couldn’t learn about things like continuity and storyboarding without either apprenticing with a filmmaker or going to school. And it was a good place to meet other creative professionals.

Jason Brubaker
But all of that has changed.

Seth Hymes
Yeah. If you look at today, High Definition filmmaking equipment costs less than a semester at most film schools. The craft of filmmaking, from lighting, editing, shot composition, writing – all of it is available to learn on websites like yours, as well as other sites all over the net. And these days, most connections happen through the net. And further, many new filmmakers find their agents because they produce a short and get some heat on youtube, rather than meeting them in school.

Jason Brubaker
Sort of a silly question. But would you recommend that anybody attends film school?

Seth Hymes
I do not recommend anybody attend film school. It is an unholy waste of money and time. And not only are the schools making a huge profit, they also neglect to teach their grads about anything of real value or importance when it comes to having a career in the business. Things like real networking, fundraising, or film distribution.

Jason Brubaker
So instead of film school, what suggestions do you have for any students who is considering a degree in filmmaking?

Seth Hymes
If you’re considering film school, here’s the litmus test. If it’s a community college or vocational school where classes are anywhere from $60 to $1000, go for it. If anyone is charging more than that, they are making an obscene profit and should be dismissed outright. You will be mocked within the film business for attending such an institution. Instead, I recommend that students save their money, buy their own equipment, and learn how to shoot their own movie.

These days, filmmakers can learn everything you need to know in a week or less.

Jason Brubaker
Reading your posts on other websites and the comments that follow, I can see why some filmmakers, especially the filmmakers sitting on film school debt can get a little emotional with your perspective.

Seth Hymes
Most film school grads and filmmakers agree with me, but there are a few haters. Some people hate hearing the truth. It’s hard for some people to admit they got hosed out of $100K, but the consensus everywhere is that film school is a waste.

Jason Brubaker
I took a look at your website. Tell us what you teach there.

Seth Hymes
I teach people first, exactly why places like NYU are a complete joke and secondly, what to do instead of film school. There’s a lot of pressure to go to college, and I understand that. My book “Film Fooled” is a powerful reality check, a class by class account of NYU’s film curriculum to help people realize that no, they are not missing out on anything by skipping film school.

Jason Brubaker
Sounds like you think film schools should improve their curriculum.

Seth Hymes
Yeah. I get into the stuff they should be teaching in schools. Mainly, how to be taken seriously as a director from day one, how to get on real film sets, meet real working filmmakers, write feature scripts, manage a set, hire film students, and get seen. Anyone taking my course will be 4 years ahead of any film school student in just a week.

Jason Brubaker
Ok. So tell us about your online film course.

Seth Hymes
Ok. To find out more about my courseware at Film School Secrets, prospective filmmakers can Click Here!

Jason Brubaker
Thanks for stopping by Seth.

Seth Hymes
Thanks for having me.

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As a general disclaimer, all the links in this article are affiliate links. Please conduct your own due diligence before making any purchase, both here and anywhere on earth.

Film Festival Workshop

Do you know of any film festivals seeking someone to put on a film festival workshop? If so, please send them a link to this page.

Over the next year, I am hitting the road. I’m going from city to city to spread the word about modern movie distribution tactics and how YOU can benefit. I am doing this because the independent movie market is saturated with competition. And as a result, finding a traditional distribution deal for your movie (that actually pays money) is increasingly challenging.

After failing to garner a traditional distribution deal for my first feature film, I had to figure out how to market and sell my movie through modern internet marketing strategies. The good news is, five years later our movie is still selling!

As a result of this experience, I have developed an easy to follow, step-by-step modern movie distribution presentation. In it, I show independent filmmakers how to maximize movie profits without the middle-man!

If you are interested in seeing me live, forward this article to every film festival director you know. And if you can’t wait to see me, watch the video below:

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“Exceptionally sharp, focused and insightful, Jason Brubaker knows how to squeeze profits out of a film release. When I have to deal with marketing – whether it’s getting a film released or setting up a panel discussion – Jason is on my team. He knows how to do the job and he knows how to explain the process.”

-Norman Berns; Emmy-Award Winning Producer

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“Jason delivered a terrific presentation at The Business of Entertainment IV networking event. His topic was “How to Sell Your Movie Without a Middleman” and featured insights and tips on how students and independent producers can leverage Internet distribution for a profit. Jason was informative and entertaining; and he received excellent reviews from the participants. We will definitely engage Jason again and look forward to more of the same professional and personable observations and advice!”

- Von Johnson

Thank YOU for helping me spread the modern moviemaking movement.

 

Movie Marketing: Are Film Festivals Losing Relevance?

Filmmakers often utilize film festivals as a way to get their work seen and hopefully sold. And while acceptance to top-tier festivals is super exciting – the reality is, many filmmakers do not get in.

As a result, many of these semi-dejected filmmakers take a shotgun approach to their festival strategy. They start applying for most every regional and local film festival, everywhere. And aside from outlandish application fees, upon arrival to these festivals – instead of  meeting a bunch of VIP acquisitions executives, most second tier festivals are populated by a bunch of other desperate filmmakers shoving postcards in your face, eagerly advertising their screening times to, well, other filmmakers.

Sometimes this includes free beer. (Most times not.)

While having delusions of distribution grandeur is still part of the film festival fun – with the demise of DVD distribution, and the odds that you won’t get into Sundance – it is vitally important that you create a film festival strategy PLAN B.

What is a film festival strategy PLAN B?

Simply put, if you are serious about making your movie profitable, YOU are now responsible for marketing, promotion and distribution of your movie. And inline with this strategy, you must view regional and second tier festivals as an opportunity to build your audience list. But instead of handing out postcards to other filmmakers, your marketing strategy will be smarter.

Here are five tips on making film festivals relevant to your movie business:

  1. Write a press release specific to the festival and then distribute to the local press. This also involves picking up the phone and personally inviting the press to attend your screening. Many festivals will have a press list. You can use this – but I would also advise conducting additional internet searches for other press outlets.
  2. Many local towns have a filmmaker community. Reach out to them. If you are traveling, it’s great to have someone to pal around with. The secondary benefit to this is, many of these same people will have relationships with the festival staff – always good to know people on the staff.
  3. If the festival allows it, see if you can take several clipboards into your screening. You’ll want to collect the names and email addresses of each viewer and get their permission to email them. Later you will enter this data into your audience list.
  4. If your film website does not include a blog component, add one. Then update frequently. Add pictures and video. Let the world know your movie is screening. People like this stuff.
  5. And finally, most regional festivals have panel discussions with industry experts. Make sure you attend these. Take your business cards. And then try to build relationships with whomever is on the panel. (And as a side note, if you know anybody looking for a panelist – I suggest inviting Jason Brubaker from Filmmaking Stuff? Just sayin’)

Out of everthing I mentioned, the most important strategy for your movie and your modern moviemaking career is grow your own fan base. This way, when you focus on building your audience list, you stress a lot less about the traditional distribution deal you may or may not have received at one of the notorious festivals.

So yes. Film festivals are still relevant. They offer a great way to source an audience for a minimal marketing investment.

Also, I’d like to thank one of our filmmaking stuff readers named Michael for this question. If you would like to get on the filmmaking stuff VIP list, click here >>

Indie PMD With Jon Reiss and Sheri Candler

Jon Reiss and Sheri Candler stopped by Filmmaking Stuff a few months back to discuss the  new role of the indie PMD. For those of you who aren’t aware of the term – PMD stands for producer of marketing and distribution. It’s a phrase Jon Reiss coined in his filmmaking book called Think Outside the Box Office.

The feedback was so awesome, that I decided to have the interview transcribed. And in text form, it comes out to over 20 pages of useful filmmaking information.

If you’re a modern moviemaker – heck, it doesn’t matter if you’re a film student or a working professional, the content in this interview is recommended reading for all filmmakers. While I think it’s worth a gazillion bucks, I decided to simply give it away! To get your complementary copy of the Jon Reiss and Sheri Candler interview by Jason Brubaker, click here  >>

Happy Filmmaking!